Jump up ^ "Requirement to take out insurance, "Frequently Asked Questions" (FAQ)". http://www.bag.admin.ch/themen/krankenversicherung/06377/index.html?lang=en. Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (FOPH), Federal Department of Home Affairs FDHA. 8 January 2012. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 December 2013. Retrieved 21 November 2013. External link in |website= (help)
adj (+er) (lit, fig) → gesund; a healthy mind in a healthy body → ein gesunder Geist in einem gesunden Körper; to earn a healthy profit → einen ansehnlichen Gewinn machen; he has a healthy bank balance → sein Kontostand ist gesund; a healthy dose of something → ein gesundes Maß an etw (dat); that’s not a healthy idea/attitude → das ist keine vernünftige Idee/gesunde Haltung; to have a healthy respect for somebody/something → einen gesunden Respekt vor jdm/etw haben; a healthy interest in something → ein gesundes Interesse an etw (dat)
Before the development of medical expense insurance, patients were expected to pay health care costs out of their own pockets, under what is known as the fee-for-service business model. During the middle-to-late 20th century, traditional disability insurance evolved into modern health insurance programs. One major obstacle to this development was that early forms of comprehensive health insurance were enjoined by courts for violating the traditional ban on corporate practice of the professions by for-profit corporations.[64] State legislatures had to intervene and expressly legalize health insurance as an exception to that traditional rule. Today, most comprehensive private health insurance programs cover the cost of routine, preventive, and emergency health care procedures, and most prescription drugs (but this is not always the case).
Prices are fixed by law, so you will not find better prices for the same plan anywhere else. But comparing your options might help you find low-cost health insurance. You can shop around online and use free quotes from eHealth to find providers that offer high-quality, low-cost individual and family health insurance plans. Seeing all your options could make finding low-cost health insurance easier.
eHealth is a free service, with an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau, providing easy-to-use-and-understand plan finders and comparison tools. Plans sold through eHealth won't cost more than if you buy directly from one of our providers. eHealth will recommend plans that are best suited to your needs and budget, whether it's during the annual open enrollment period or if you have a qualifying life event. In certain states, eHealth can even help you apply for the Affordable Care Act tax credit offered by the government. eHealth is proudly invested in helping you with all your medical insurance questions and concerns, including:
1. well, sound, fit, strong, active, flourishing, hardy, blooming, robust, vigorous, sturdy, hale, hearty, in good shape (informal), in good condition, in the pink, alive and kicking, fighting fit, in fine form, in fine fettle, hale and hearty, fit as a fiddle (informal), right as rain (Brit. informal), physically fit, in fine feather She had a normal pregnancy and delivered a healthy child.
If something unexpected happens to you – like a car accident or a serious illness – hospital expenses can quickly rack up. Individual health insurance can help prevent staggering expenses if you face a medical emergency. Major medical insurance is a type of coverage that provides benefits for a broad range of health-care services, both inpatient and outpatient. This health insurance can save you money on routine doctor's visits, prescription drug coverage, preventative care and other medical services. The plan will typically come with costs such as a monthly premium, an annual deductible, copayments, and coinsurance.

Rather than dwelling on cutting back on red meat, think of what you’re adding to your plate. “Focus on what to eat as much as what to avoid,” Sass notes, “and be open to experimenting.” Aim big: five cups of fruits and vegetables a day. It sounds like a daunting number, but by working in a cup at breakfast (with eggs, in a smoothie or mixed into overnight oats), two at lunch and two at dinner, you can get your fill.


Recently (2009) the main representative body of British Medical physicians, the British Medical Association, adopted a policy statement expressing concerns about developments in the health insurance market in the UK. In its Annual Representative Meeting which had been agreed earlier by the Consultants Policy Group (i.e. Senior physicians) stating that the BMA was "extremely concerned that the policies of some private healthcare insurance companies are preventing or restricting patients exercising choice about (i) the consultants who treat them; (ii) the hospital at which they are treated; (iii) making top up payments to cover any gap between the funding provided by their insurance company and the cost of their chosen private treatment." It went in to "call on the BMA to publicise these concerns so that patients are fully informed when making choices about private healthcare insurance."[50] The practice of insurance companies deciding which consultant a patient may see as opposed to GPs or patients is referred to as Open Referral.[51] The NHS offers patients a choice of hospitals and consultants and does not charge for its services.
The Australian government announced in May 2008 that it proposes to increase the thresholds, to $100,000 for singles and $150,000 for families. These changes require legislative approval. A bill to change the law has been introduced but was not passed by the Senate.[12] An amended version was passed on 16 October 2008. There have been criticisms that the changes will cause many people to drop their private health insurance, causing a further burden on the public hospital system, and a rise in premiums for those who stay with the private system. Other commentators believe the effect will be minimal.[13]
Comprehensive health insurance pays a percentage of the cost of hospital and physician charges after a deductible (usually applies to hospital charges) or a co-pay (usually applies to physician charges, but may apply to some hospital services) is met by the insured. These plans are generally expensive because of the high potential benefit payout — $1,000,000 to $5,000,000 is common — and because of the vast array of covered benefits.
The first government responsibility is the fixing of the rate at which medical expenses should be negotiated, and it does so in two ways: The Ministry of Health directly negotiates prices of medicine with the manufacturers, based on the average price of sale observed in neighboring countries. A board of doctors and experts decides if the medicine provides a valuable enough medical benefit to be reimbursed (note that most medicine is reimbursed, including homeopathy). In parallel, the government fixes the reimbursement rate for medical services: this means that a doctor is free to charge the fee that he wishes for a consultation or an examination, but the social security system will only reimburse it at a pre-set rate. These tariffs are set annually through negotiation with doctors' representative organisations.
Since 1974, New Zealand has had a system of universal no-fault health insurance for personal injuries through the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC). The ACC scheme covers most of the costs of related to treatment of injuries acquired in New Zealand (including overseas visitors) regardless of how the injury occurred, and also covers lost income (at 80 percent of the employee's pre-injury income) and costs related to long-term rehabilitation, such as home and vehicle modifications for those seriously injured. Funding from the scheme comes from a combination of levies on employers' payroll (for work injuries), levies on an employee's taxable income (for non-work injuries to salary earners), levies on vehicle licensing fees and petrol (for motor vehicle accidents), and funds from the general taxation pool (for non-work injuries to children, senior citizens, unemployed people, overseas visitors, etc.)
Living a healthy life means making lifestyle choices that support your physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional well-being. Managing your health can be challenging at times; while one facet of your wellness demands more attention than others, you may end up struggling to maintain a good balance in other areas. To be of sound body, mind, and spirit, it’s important to pay attention to all aspects of health—your mental, emotional, and spiritual sides all play a role in your physical welfare, and vice versa. A state of optimal well-being means more than just the absence of disease or disorder; it also means having the resources to cope with problems and circumstances beyond your control and recover from difficult or troubling situations. This intersection between health and behavior can help you prevent illness, and steer you to make better decisions about your well-being.
Comprehensive health insurance pays a percentage of the cost of hospital and physician charges after a deductible (usually applies to hospital charges) or a co-pay (usually applies to physician charges, but may apply to some hospital services) is met by the insured. These plans are generally expensive because of the high potential benefit payout — $1,000,000 to $5,000,000 is common — and because of the vast array of covered benefits.
Rather than dwelling on cutting back on red meat, think of what you’re adding to your plate. “Focus on what to eat as much as what to avoid,” Sass notes, “and be open to experimenting.” Aim big: five cups of fruits and vegetables a day. It sounds like a daunting number, but by working in a cup at breakfast (with eggs, in a smoothie or mixed into overnight oats), two at lunch and two at dinner, you can get your fill.
In the first decade of the 21st century, the conceptualization of health as an ability opened the door for self-assessments to become the main indicators to judge the performance of efforts aimed at improving human health[16]. It also created the opportunity for every person to feel healthy, even in the presence of multiple chronic diseases, or a terminal condition, and for the re-examination of determinants of health, away from the traditional approach that focuses on the reduction of the prevalence of diseases[17].
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