Jump up ^ Bump, Jesse B. (19 October 2010). "The long road to universal health coverage. A century of lessons for development strategy" (PDF). Seattle: PATH. Retrieved 10 March 2013. Carrin and James have identified 1988—105 years after Bismarck's first sickness fund laws—as the date Germany achieved universal health coverage through this series of extensions to minimum benefit packages and expansions of the enrolled population. Bärnighausen and Sauerborn have quantified this long-term progressive increase in the proportion of the German population covered by public and private insurance. Their graph is reproduced below as Figure 1: German Population Enrolled in Health Insurance (%) 1885–1995.
Rather than dwelling on cutting back on red meat, think of what you’re adding to your plate. “Focus on what to eat as much as what to avoid,” Sass notes, “and be open to experimenting.” Aim big: five cups of fruits and vegetables a day. It sounds like a daunting number, but by working in a cup at breakfast (with eggs, in a smoothie or mixed into overnight oats), two at lunch and two at dinner, you can get your fill.
In 2006, a new system of health insurance came into force in the Netherlands. This new system avoids the two pitfalls of adverse selection and moral hazard associated with traditional forms of health insurance by using a combination of regulation and an insurance equalization pool. Moral hazard is avoided by mandating that insurance companies provide at least one policy which meets a government set minimum standard level of coverage, and all adult residents are obliged by law to purchase this coverage from an insurance company of their choice. All insurance companies receive funds from the equalization pool to help cover the cost of this government-mandated coverage. This pool is run by a regulator which collects salary-based contributions from employers, which make up about 50% of all health care funding, and funding from the government to cover people who cannot afford health care, which makes up an additional 5%.[40]
Categories: English words suffixed with -nessEnglish terms with audio linksEnglish 2-syllable wordsEnglish terms with IPA pronunciationEnglish lemmasEnglish nounsEnglish uncountable nounsEnglish countable nounsen:Evolutionary theoryBritish EnglishEnglish slangen:Physical fitnessFrench terms borrowed from EnglishFrench terms derived from EnglishFrench 2-syllable wordsFrench terms with IPA pronunciationFrench terms with audio linksFrench lemmasFrench nounsFrench masculine nounsFrench uncountable nounsPolish terms borrowed from EnglishPolish terms derived from EnglishPolish terms with IPA pronunciationPolish lemmasPolish nounsPolish masculine nounsPolish singularia tantumPortuguese terms borrowed from EnglishPortuguese terms derived from EnglishPortuguese terms with IPA pronunciationPortuguese lemmasPortuguese nounspt:Artificial intelligenceSpanish lemmasSpanish nounsSpanish uncountable nouns
×