The private health system in Australia operates on a "community rating" basis, whereby premiums do not vary solely because of a person's previous medical history, current state of health, or (generally speaking) their age (but see Lifetime Health Cover below). Balancing this are waiting periods, in particular for pre-existing conditions (usually referred to within the industry as PEA, which stands for "pre-existing ailment"). Funds are entitled to impose a waiting period of up to 12 months on benefits for any medical condition the signs and symptoms of which existed during the six months ending on the day the person first took out insurance. They are also entitled to impose a 12-month waiting period for benefits for treatment relating to an obstetric condition, and a 2-month waiting period for all other benefits when a person first takes out private insurance. Funds have the discretion to reduce or remove such waiting periods in individual cases. They are also free not to impose them to begin with, but this would place such a fund at risk of "adverse selection", attracting a disproportionate number of members from other funds, or from the pool of intending members who might otherwise have joined other funds. It would also attract people with existing medical conditions, who might not otherwise have taken out insurance at all because of the denial of benefits for 12 months due to the PEA Rule. The benefits paid out for these conditions would create pressure on premiums for all the fund's members, causing some to drop their membership, which would lead to further rises in premiums, and a vicious cycle of higher premiums-leaving members would ensue.


Long-term care (Pflegeversicherung[36]) is covered half and half by employer and employee and covers cases in which a person is not able to manage his or her daily routine (provision of food, cleaning of apartment, personal hygiene, etc.). It is about 2% of a yearly salaried income or pension, with employers matching the contribution of the employee.
The Commonwealth Fund, in its annual survey, "Mirror, Mirror on the Wall", compares the performance of the health care systems in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada and the U.S. Its 2007 study found that, although the U.S. system is the most expensive, it consistently under-performs compared to the other countries.[6] One difference between the U.S. and the other countries in the study is that the U.S. is the only country without universal health insurance coverage.

Coinsurance: Instead of, or in addition to, paying a fixed amount up front (a co-payment), the co-insurance is a percentage of the total cost that insured person may also pay. For example, the member might have to pay 20% of the cost of a surgery over and above a co-payment, while the insurance company pays the other 80%. If there is an upper limit on coinsurance, the policy-holder could end up owing very little, or a great deal, depending on the actual costs of the services they obtain.
The cases have been confirmed by state health departments, and at least two are from Wisconsin. — Rick Barrett, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Wisconsin included in Cyclospora outbreak tied to McDonald's salads," 14 July 2018 This liberal worldview will be boosted by the promotion of Matt Hancock, who now rules the health department and has similar instincts. — The Economist, "A quiet revolution in Theresa May’s cabinet," 12 July 2018 The state health department conducts unannounced inspections when the clinics are being relicensed every four years, as well as inspections when complaints are filed. — Christopher Keating, courant.com, "What Would Overturning Roe V. Wade Mean For Abortion Access In Connecticut?," 11 July 2018 Some local and state health departments monitor beaches for contamination. — Glenn Howatt, chicagotribune.com, "Swimming pools, hot tubs are more likely than lakes to make you sick, studies find," 11 July 2018 After tests by the health department were completed, the pool was closed. — Wzzm-tv (grand Rapids), Detroit Free Press, "4 kids, 2 adults hospitalized after getting sick at West Michigan hotel," 9 July 2018 For a restaurant, this could include providing a link to a health department grade or report if somebody falsely accuses the restaurant of being unclean. — Damian J. Troise, USA TODAY, "How should businesses respond to bad reviews? Tips to combat negative social media," 7 July 2018 The health department agreed with his concerns, and the patient was moved. — Martha Bellisle, The Seattle Times, "With patients at risk, Western State Hospital is ‘like going into hell’," 7 July 2018 The health department agreed with his concerns, and the patient was moved. — Fox News, "Washington hospital is 'like going into hell'," 6 July 2018

As far as the compulsory health insurance is concerned, the insurance companies cannot set any conditions relating to age, sex or state of health for coverage. Although the level of premium can vary from one company to another, they must be identical within the same company for all insured persons of the same age group and region, regardless of sex or state of health. This does not apply to complementary insurance, where premiums are risk-based.


Health, as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), is "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity."[1][2] This definition has been subject to controversy, as it may have limited value for implementation.[3][4][5] Health may be defined as the ability to adapt and manage physical, mental and social challenges throughout life.[6]
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